What Is The Climate In Delaware

What Is The Climate In Delaware?

Delaware is a small state located in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. It’s known for its beautiful beaches, diverse wildlife, and unique culture. The climate in Delaware also contributes to its attractiveness as a vacation and travel destination.

Overview of Delaware’s Climate

Delaware has a humid subtropical climate, meaning it experiences warm and humid summers and cool to mild winters. The state experiences four distinct seasons, with summer being the longest and hottest. The average temperature in summer ranges from 75–85°F (24–29°C), and in winter it ranges from 30–45°F (-1–7°C).

Annual Precipitation in Delaware

Delaware’s annual precipitation ranges from a low of 32 inches (81.3 cm) in the southern part of the state to a high of 43 inches (109.2 cm) in the northern part. The majority of the state receives between 35–40 inches (88.9–101.6 cm) of precipitation annually. The majority of the precipitation falls during the winter and spring months, with the summer months being relatively dry.

Extreme Weather in Delaware

Delaware is susceptible to extreme weather, including thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods. The state also experiences occasional winter storms, which can bring icy conditions and heavy snowfall.

Conclusion

Delaware has a humid subtropical climate that brings warm and humid summers and cool to mild winters to the state. The average temperature in summer ranges from 75–85°F (24–29°C), and in winter it ranges from 30–45°F (-1–7°C). The state’s precipitation ranges from 32 inches (81.3 cm) in the south to 43 inches (109.2 cm) in the north, with the majority of the precipitation falling during the winter and spring months. Delaware is also susceptible to extreme weather, such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods.