What Are Climate Lockdowns

What Are Climate Lockdowns?

Climate lockdowns are a form of direct action that involves peaceful civil disobedience. They are a way to call attention to the urgency of climate change and push for action from governments and corporations. The goal of a climate lockdown is to disrupt the everyday functioning of an institution or infrastructure in order to bring attention to the need for action on climate change.

History of Climate Lockdowns

The first climate lockdown took place in 2014 in London, when activists from groups such as Greenpeace and Extinction Rebellion chained themselves to the doors of a coal-fired power station. Since then, climate lockdowns have continued to be used as a form of direct action around the world.

How Climate Lockdowns Work

Climate lockdowns are typically organized by groups of activists who gather together to take direct action. The goal is to prevent the functioning of a certain infrastructure or institution, such as a power plant, a government building, or a corporate headquarters. The lockdowns are usually nonviolent and involve linking arms or chaining themselves together in order to prevent access to the site.

The Impact of Climate Lockdowns

Climate lockdowns are an effective way to bring attention to the urgency of climate change and push for action. They are a way for activists to make their voices heard and to put pressure on governments and corporations to take action on climate change.

Climate lockdowns can also be dangerous for activists, as they often involve facing off with police or security forces. The risk of being arrested or injured is real, and so activists must be prepared for the consequences of their actions.

Conclusion

Climate lockdowns are a way for activists to take direct action to call attention to the urgency of climate change and push for action from governments and corporations. They are a powerful tool, but also a risky one, and so it is important for activists to be aware of the risks involved.